The GROUND Issue 4 “Globalization and Empowering Women”

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On March 5, 2014 & posted in Art, Editor's picks, Exclusive, Print


© The GROUND Issue #04, Cover photo by Ralph Gibson

 

The GROUND is a product of New York City. However, the contents are also produced in many other locations such as London, Paris, Tokyo, Seoul, Milan, Barcelona and Venice. Not limiting our workflow to only one communication channel, we worked remotely all over the globe more than ever especially for this issue.

People might have a different understanding and interpretation of the word, globalization. I personally interpret the word as a meaning of breaking boundaries. The interview with Montse Aguer, the director of the Center for Dalinian Studies, about Salvador Dalí’s effort to break boundaries sets the tone for this issue.


I often emphasize that the process of making content bears a lot of energy, inspiration and excitement. Each process could become interesting content. I spent more than six months with The GROUND’s curator, Saulo Madrid, to create a printed exhibition, “Globalization,” which is a new exhibition concept. His journey started with geographical challenges and time differences with the subjects we are featuring in the exhibition based on globalization and empowering women.

 

© The GROUND Issue #04, Back Cover

 

 

Madrid’s nomadic journey for the project started from Montreal to New York, Tokyo, Dubai, Paris, Venice and many other places. His conversation with Jean-Hubert Martin who was the chief curator of the Salvador Dalí Exhibition at Center Pompidou happened through many different communication channels remotely and in person. Madrid continued his journey and challenges by featuring artists, editors, entrepreneurs, producers, and image/object creators.

 

 

The GROUND also made effort toward featuring empowering women who represent different countries: Serbian artist, Marina Abramović; Iraqi-born architect, Zaha Hadid; Tunisian-born artist, Nadia Ayari; Japanese-born creative director and fashion film director, Nian Fish and Michèle Lamy who is best known as the wife, muse and creative accomplice of Rick Owens.

Through their visions and thoughts on being empowering women in our society, The GROUND believes readers can understand the importance and meaning of having women in important positions in our world. Different perspectives about women are also shown in the interviews of female DJs and in the interview of legendary photographer, Ralph Gibson, who understands women as a perfect subject.

 

 

As you may know, many of The GROUND’s featured subjects are intertwined by coincidence and destiny. We connect architect Zaha Hadid to photographer Ralph Gibson, who expresses great respect for Hadid’s unique, architectural visual language. I could find similar shapes from Ralph Gibson’s photographic work and Zaha Hadid’s architectural work.

While we were still working on the feature of artist Marina Abramović as an empowering woman who believes art has no gender, Nian Fish gave us an idea about who she might think of as an empowering woman. Without hesitancy, she coincidently mentioned Marina Abramović, who Fish collaborated with recently.

 

Furthermore, the featuring of Montse Aguer, Jean-Hubert Martin, Salvador Dalí’s muse, Amanda Lear, together in the same issue was inevitable.

For this issue’s charity feature, The GROUND partnered up with the Breast Cancer Research Foundation to show our sincerity for supporting charity organizations and the empowerment of women. On our “Charity Tweet” page, we also listed non-governmental organizations that the public should become aware of and consider participating in.

 

As we publish more issues, I hope that more readers will understand The GROUND’s endeavor to support charitable works and how The GROUND looks for different approaches in creating content to help up-and-coming creatives in many different industries.
As the editor-in-chief and on behalf of The GROUND magazine staffs and contributors, I hope you enjoy the “globalization and empowering women” issue.

 

© Ralph Gibson, Courtesy of Ralph Gibson

 



 

 

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